Singapore East Workshops Training

In Singapore East the Government has always been very supportive of its workforce, new start-ups, small and medium enterprises and is supporting them through out by providing Singapore East SMEs with generous grants. At LifeSkillNutrition we have gathered the 7 most popular Singapore SME grants to help boost business growth, namely:

1. Capability Development Grant (CDG)
2. Enhanced iSPRINT
3. Market Readiness Assistance (MRA) Grant
4. ACE Startups Grant
5. Innovation & Capability Voucher (ICV)
6. Productivity-Max (P-Max) Programme
7. Productivity Innovation Project (PIP) Scheme

The purpose of these grants in SGP East is to encourage SMEs’ to innovate, build business capabilities, use technology, streamline productivity & financial management and support with its international expansion to improve overall growth and productivity.

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Free information by LifeSkillsNutrition on training programs applicable for Government allowance.

Always use the Government’s free, official website “.gov” rather than commercial sites that may charge a fee for grant information or application forms. It offers reliable and most updated information from to help residents (Singaporeans and PRs) and local entities find and apply for grants. All training programs eligible for Government grants are licensed i.e. they have the formal permission from a governmental to carry out projects with a public purpose and are not intended for personal benefits.

Are You Lost In Mid-Life Career Transitions?

Have you been feeling bored or frustrated at work lately? Or, do you work in an industry with falling job opportunities or wage stagnation? If you’re a mid-career worker considering switching careers for whatever reason, here’s good news.



Transitioning to a new career and industry doesn’t mean that you will need to begin from the bottom. Even if it’s not in the same field, your experience still counts and can help you skip over entry-level positions.



If you’re considering making a change to your career path, start by evaluating what you want to be doing, and what job would make you happy. Take a look at this advice on how to know if you should switch jobs—or switch careers. Then, see how to create a transition plan to ensure a successful career switch.



Why Do You Want to Transition—And to What?
If you’ve reached the mid-career level, you’ve worked for around 10 years, if not longer. It’s not unreasonable that you may feel a desire for change. The question is, what’s the right change for you? Here are some of the possibilities to consider:



New Job in the Same Field: If you fundamentally enjoy the work your work and are engaged by your industry, you may just want a new job. In this scenario, it may just be your particular job—the co-workers, the hours, the culture, etc.—that isn’t a good fit, rather than this type of job or career in general. Often, mid-career professional workers are promoted into management positions that are less personally satisfying than when they worked directly on projects. If that’s the case for you, you may want to move down the career ladder within your field.



New Career in Different Industry, Using Similar Skills: If your industry is contracting or growing obsolete, or you feel ready for a significant change in focus, a job that utilizes your same skills, but with a twist, might be your best option. For instance, a journalist might want to switch to public relations, still using storytelling and communications skills, but in a different arena.



A Total Career Pivot: Sometimes a complete change is necessary. At mid-career, many people want to reinvent their work life (and themselves!) entirely. Think of the corporate worker who yearns to leave the city entirely and work on a farm. That’s a big transition—but it’s doable. For a strong, successful transition, you’ll need to identify what is currently making you unhappy, and what will make you happy in the future. Take a look at these tips for evaluating whether your career needs a makeover. Speak with co-workers and friend, and get their take. These conversations may help clarify how big a move you should make. Think about all the jobs you’ve ever held, stretching back to after-school and summer job as a teen, for more insight into what you do well, and what you enjoy most. If your first job was in retail, for instance, was it helping customers find what they wanted that was most satisfying, or leaving the shelves orderly at the end of the day?
If you’re struggling to figure out what you want or are overwhelmed with the possibilities, take a look at some of these free career quizzes, aptitude tests, and self-assessment tools.



Create a Plan: Once you identify your ideal job, your next step is to come up with a plan for how to get it. You’ll need to engage with real-world considerations (think: monthly bills; your kids’ schools; etc.) to ensure that your dream career is realistic based on your existing responsibilities. And, you’ll need to evaluate which skills you have, and which skills you’ll need to add. In some cases, you'll be able to change careers without going back to school.



Identify Your Current Skills: List out all your skills and abilities. What skills and talents do you possess, and how could they be applied to your new field? Remember, as a seasoned worker; you’re in luck: many of the skills employers seek out the most are transferable. Unlike an entry-level employee, you’re not starting from scratch. If you have worked in television production, for instance, but want to move to human resources, your interpersonal skills, as well as problem-solving abilities, and a knack at juggling tasks and managing personalities, can be tremendously helpful.



Identify the Skills You Need to Have: Next, look at job postings for the position you want to have. What requirements are listed? Remember, you don’t need to have every requirement listed on a job posting to apply—but there are some that are often deal-breakers. You may need to take a class or get a degree. You may need to take a salary cut and start at a lower-level position than the one you’re at currently. Or, you may need to think of creative ways to add experience to your resume, such as taking on a volunteer position that allows you to learn new skills.
Use all of this information to create a timeline and to-do list for your transition to new work—this may involve taking classes,