Tanah Merah Career Support Programme

Key for for all individuals and corporate based in Tanah Merah Singapore, should always be on skill enhancements. Most times mid-life career changers are overlooked when we consider the need for career guidance and counselling. Timely investment in nurturing the skills through appropriate training programs in today’s world of digitization could define the future of the company and the economy as a whole.

Changing Market New Economy Skills Training Program

Thus, the provision of several grants from the Singapore Government for individuals and organisations in Tanah Merah at various stages of their life is a boon. This opens a doors to a rewarding career option for those who are looking for good money and great job satisfaction from their job.

One must plan to build upon skills for their own personal and future growth. In today’s business environment, you need to manage your own learning. When you are managing employees, you think about their development within the organization. What about yours?

Personal Support Worker Program - A Satisfying Career Option

Government Grants For Cybersecurity Training

Although there is a growing trend towards purchasing digital tools as a service, the barriers to Digitalization remain relatively high. ‘Going Digital’ in itself, is expensive and requires SMEs to actively plan for the business as a whole in a longer-term time horizon.

Do You Feel Lost in your Mid-Life Career Transitions?

This article will provide you with increased insight into the world of experienced people who want or need to re-enter the employment rat race. It is aiming to provide guidance for career coaches/counselors but is just as useful if you yourself are 'lost in transition'. Sometimes mid-life career changers may be overlooked when we consider the need for career guidance and counselling.

However, the changing worlds of work as well as economic reasons have forced many people to search for jobs. We will discuss how career counseling can assist and what additional services we can offer We are going to explore some of the differences between career advising for young people and mid-life career changers who are people with life experience. Why do people seek help from career advisers? Some of the subjects about which people approach career advisers:

  • Information about possibilities
  • Pointers to the future of a particular area of work
  • Referral to a particular scheme, course or employer
  • Tips on presenting themselves in person and in writing
  • Guidelines on what action to take and when
  • To check out that they are on the right lines and are taking a sensible approach
  • To get help to see what they might like to do
  • Encouragement to keep on trying
  • Motivation to burst through barriers
  • The confidence to aim high and to success
  • To answer the question: Where am I going in my life?

Most people feel a bit scared and can feel very vulnerable when they have to ask for help. (Think of visiting a doctor or dentist) Even if the matter in question is not personal, it can feel a little humiliation to ask for help because it means admitting that you don't have all the answers about your life. This is especially true of some adults who feel that being grown up means they should know exactly where they are going and what they hope to achieve. On they other hand, young people are more used to consulting adults, and might feel more comfortable about asking advice.

When taking feelings in to account, remember that especially people that have been made redundant or have been unemployed for some time may not only feel anxious about asking advice but may also be depressed and very cynical. The treatment they may have received at places such as Job Network Agencies may have left them with a huge chip on their shoulders. This means that they could come in the career counsellor's office with an attitude!

My experience has been that the first thing I need to do is to get through the barriers that this demoralized person puts up. Empathy and respect can open the way into constructiveness. Funny enough, something as seemingly obvious as a genuine smile and a warm handshake, as they first meet with you, can be seen as a sign of respect.

Through the years, especially when working for CRS Australia as an employment consultant, I have often applied for positions, even when I did not need work; just to keep in touch with what if feels to be unemployed. I often went through the interview experience so I would remember what it was to be nervous. Even though it was never the same because I was not desperate and needy, it helped me to keep feeling a little of what the client feels.

Mid-Life Career Transitions. I have found that Super's theoretical life-stages model may need some revision. Socio-economical realities of life today tell us that people must be prepared to:

  • change jobs several times,
  • to change occupations sometimes,
  • and to consider radical changes to the form their employment may take;
  • such as a port-folio of part-time or casual jobs, or self-employment.

As we prepare to assist a larger proportion of mature adults to make career transitions, we should appreciate that their career problems often have been forced upon them by circumstances beyond their control. Let's explore how we can understand and assist mid-life career changers.

What are some of the reasons for mid-life career changes?

  • Women want to return to work after home duties.
  • People have been injured or ill and need to look for a different career.
  • Redundancy is forcing people to become job seekers
  • Midlife crisis makes people realize they want to do something different
  • Healthy people in their forties from the Defence Forces, who are now expected to retire

Can you think of other reasons? Full-time workers are more and more becoming an increasingly limited commodity. Our aging population and the anticipated retirement of the baby boomers is worsening this shortage. Furthermore, many of working Australians are now self-employed.

What have you experienced?

  • Think of some experiences you've had with mature-age people (in or outside work settings who are trying to find work or change direction).
  • What were some of the perceived barriers?
  • If you are the this person try to think about your own situation.

As you see, the transitions may be smooth or rough, anticipated or unexpected, voluntary or involuntary. Some people will come to you upset about a crisis situation. They may be fed-up with an unreasonable boss OR the increasing bureaucracy and paperwork in a job. They may be sick of commuting. There are lots or reasons and situations.

HOW CAN WE HELP OR RECEIVE HELP?

  • Career Guidance
  • Motivational Encouragement
  • Demonstrate Research calling
  • Resume preparation

If the client does not get to the interview stage look at the resume. If the resume does not open doors, look at how you could change it.

  • Selection Criteria
  • Interviewing coaching

What are the most important points to teach these job seekers about what employers look for when interviewing?

  • UNDERSTANDING OF THE JOB - RESEARCH
  • ABILITY TO DO IT- SKILLS & EXPERIENCE
  • ENTHUSIASM - ATTITUDE
  • ABILITY TO FIT IN AND WORK WITH CURRENT TEAM - INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

A PROGRAM FOR MID-CAREER CHANGERS.

We are dealing with two very different age groups such as a 17 year old High School student who will complete Year 12 this year and a Middle Manager who is about to be out placed from his position in an industrial company. Although the basic program will be following similar steps, there are differences that come into the program when dealing with Mid-life changer. The key differences, are that with the mid-life person there would be an emphasis on analyzing past experience. We would also be looking more closely at roles that have been established, as well as values and needs. Sometimes these values and needs may not have been met in the past.

Let's look at a possible nine step-counseling program The first three steps are essential for mid-career changes, while the other six are useful in any standard career counselling program.

CLARIFY THE REASONS FOR CHANGE

Both the client and the adviser need to clarify the reasons for the career change. This will also assist the client to share his story and express feelings that could be painful and confused. It is important that the career changers feel you are on their side. Some people will feel secure and optimistic and is contemplating a voluntary change. They may not be completely sure about the reasons for change but just have this 'gut' feeling they are following. Clarifying reasons for a career change will give better chances of achieving future goals.

PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR THE EXPRESSION OF EMOTIONS.

Career changes may be very traumatic and there is a need to allow the client to express emotions connected with it. There may be feeling of anger or betrayal. If the emotions are dealt with first it will clear the way for productive efforts to find and achieve new career goals.

An empathetic careers adviser, using sound practices, can often turn crisis into opportunity. As career adviser, you must expect that some of your clients, however calm they may appear, are trying to handle a traumatic career transition.

EXPLORE THE BROADER CONSEQUENCES OF A CAREER CHANGE.

The client also needs to face the broad consequences of a career change. Many areas of his life will be affected by the changes and dealing with this will provide a basic framework, which will help to ensure that no important aspect is neglected in the later stages.

What is the 'big picture'? How is the career change going the affect the client and their future life. Our aim is that the client will become aware of the complex ramifications of the decisions, goals and plans that lie ahead. For example: as adviser you may raise the issue of retraining or further study, whether it appears relevant or not. At this stage you will want to explain the steps that are involved in the process ahead. This gives the client a feel that he is sharing control of a process he understands. Another matter likely to be explored is the financial implications of a career change. Possible relocation?

INDENTIFY:

CLIENT'S EXPERIENCE.

Now we come to identifying the client's experience and probing how it can be used for future choices. The big difference between young career-starters and older career-changers is that the latter have experience which will add greatly to the basis for decision-making.

  • Specific work experiences - what kind of work?
  • Likes and dislikes of former jobs?
  • Specific educational and training experiences?
  • What aspects did he enjoy and do well at?
  • What kind of leisure experiences can the client recall?
  • What kind does he prefer?
  • Has the client received any kind of special recognition or awards?

You can analyze these things in various ways: Autobiographical sketch, guided by some structured questions, probably as homework You may use interview questioning and make brief notes. What the client reveals about past experiences can also be used to obtain indications of skills possessed by the client.

INTERESTS.

Appropriately identifying client interests can lead to a possible occupational list. Most convenient for classifying personalities and occupations is probably the Career Voyage program. This program, only available to accredited career counselors, can be used through web access and clients can continue to work further at home even after they have seen a Career Counselor.

SKILLS.

It is surprising how often people are unaware of their own skills. Identifying client skills in various areas such as work, hobbies, social activities, volunteer work, and other activities. Various skills assessment instruments are available.

VALUES AND NEEDS.

Now we come to a very important area, the heart of the process identifying the client's values and needs. We move towards our values. The knowledge of personal values and needs can provide a powerful focus for goals and assist with a successful occupational choice.

CONSIDER RELEVANT EDUCATIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION.

Research relevant educational and occupational information through various sources. I would include some instructions here on how to conduct research calling to empower the client in his research.

HELP THE CLIENT TO MAKE DECISIONS AND PLAN ACTION.

Conclude the career counseling program with assisting the client to make decision and preparing a realistic action plan.

  • What options have emerged?
  • What (if any) retraining or further education may be needed?
  • Which option offers the most?

Changing Market New Economy Skills Training Program

Training Incentive Allowance Application

New government grants for startups, instituted to provide funding to individuals and SMEs to hon their skills for better future.

Key areas suggested by Lifeskillsnutrition where you may benefits in future are:

  • Business excellence program
  • Business strategy development program
  • Technology innovation program
  • Human capital development program
  • Intellectual property and franchising program
  • Productivity improvement program
  • Enhancing quality and standards program

Employee engagement that is often used is providing training and development. We know that this is a very strong motivator, particularly among early and mid-career employees. The opportunity to grow, to continue to learn, to be challenged, to be able to take relevant course work either through tuition reimbursement programs for education outside of the company, or through company sponsored training can be a strong motivator. Additionally, mentoring, various types of project work, and job rotation, are all different ways that companies can encourage the increasing knowledge and skills of their workers. This is often very effective portion of the employee engagement strategy.

However, there are challenges for this strategy as well. As companies have downsized, particularly in the latest economic downturn, they may be unable to afford the training budgets that they used to offer. Some companies are getting creative in this area, but again cost is a limiting factor.

Another concern around training and development is that sometimes employers will use training as a solution for other problems when, in fact, it may be a system or operational issue or other type of issue. Some companies will throw a training solution at a problem when training is not really the solution to the problem. So training and development can be misused as a method of employee engagement.

That leads us to the question, "What other strategies are there?", What we're finding which is really motivating and incredibly effective for increasing employee engagement, is meaningful work. Meaningful work, where employees are engaged in such a manner that aligns with their values, doing work, performing tasks, using knowledge and skills that really allow them to contribute. Not just their time and their experience, but in a form of work which somehow resonates with their personal values, their personal mission, their personal passions. Employees are seeking a way to express this in the workplace and I have seen this throughout my experience working with organizations.

The most admired leaders have a deep commitment to what they are doing. Not just how they contribute to the products and services of their company but the bigger picture. Their real vision for what they are accomplishing on a grander scale is a huge motivator for employees, especially those in a leadership role. In fact, Kelly Global Workforce conducted a study with over a hundred thousand people across 34 countries worldwide and over half of the workers in this study said they would give up status and pay to have more meaningful work. Just think about that - over half of the people in the study, would rather be doing meaningful work than have better status and more pay.

What is interesting to note about the study is that it was conducted during the worst of the recessionary time in late 2008, the beginning of 2009. So amidst a global economic crisis, workers were saying that meaning is more important than pay. I think therefore that this new approach to employee engagement should be what companies and organizations are looking at. How do we make sure that employees are really are aligned with what the company is doing and that the company is providing goods and services that contribute to society in a positive way? How do we ensure that what workers are doing in their individual roles and responsibility taps in to what is personally meaningful for each of them?