Changi Skill Boost Course

Key for for all individuals and corporate based in Changi Singapore, should always be on skill enhancements. Most times mid-life career changers are overlooked when we consider the need for career guidance and counselling. Timely investment in nurturing the skills through appropriate training programs in today’s world of digitization could define the future of the company and the economy as a whole.

Changing Market New Economy Skills Training Program

Thus, the provision of several grants from the Singapore Government for individuals and organisations in Changi at various stages of their life is a boon. This opens a doors to a rewarding career option for those who are looking for good money and great job satisfaction from their job.

One must plan to build upon skills for their own personal and future growth. In today’s business environment, you need to manage your own learning. When you are managing employees, you think about their development within the organization. What about yours?

Mid-career Singaporeans And PRs To Get More Subsidies For Training

Provincial Training Allowance Eligibility

Although there is a growing trend towards purchasing digital tools as a service, the barriers to Digitalization remain relatively high. ‘Going Digital’ in itself, is expensive and requires SMEs to actively plan for the business as a whole in a longer-term time horizon.

Communicating in a world with an 8-second attention span isn't easy. If you’re looking to improve your business communications the courses below can help you achieve this —from developing your interpersonal and presentation skills to perfecting your professional writing techniques. These engaging seminars and classes will provide you with techniques to communicate up and down the corporate ladder. Whether it’s a face-to-face conversation or a professionally written e-mail exchange, you should be able to interact effectively across all mediums.


The communication courses and seminars below have helped many business professionals like you develop a truly engaging and responsive communication style, leading to positive outcomes for you and your organization. Choose from any of the seminars below to learn how improving your communication skills will give you an advantage in today's business environment.

The Benefit of a Personal Support Worker Training Program

Government Grants For Retraining

New government grants for startups, instituted to provide funding to individuals and SMEs to hon their skills for better future.

Key areas suggested by Lifeskillsnutrition where you may benefits in future are:

  • Business excellence program
  • Business strategy development program
  • Technology innovation program
  • Human capital development program
  • Intellectual property and franchising program
  • Productivity improvement program
  • Enhancing quality and standards program

Have you been feeling bored or frustrated at work lately? Or, do you work in an industry with falling job opportunities or wage stagnation? If you’re a mid-career worker considering switching careers for whatever reason, here’s good news.



Transitioning to a new career and industry doesn’t mean that you will need to begin from the bottom. Even if it’s not in the same field, your experience still counts and can help you skip over entry-level positions.



If you’re considering making a change to your career path, start by evaluating what you want to be doing, and what job would make you happy. Take a look at this advice on how to know if you should switch jobs—or switch careers. Then, see how to create a transition plan to ensure a successful career switch.



Why Do You Want to Transition—And to What?
If you’ve reached the mid-career level, you’ve worked for around 10 years, if not longer. It’s not unreasonable that you may feel a desire for change. The question is, what’s the right change for you? Here are some of the possibilities to consider:



New Job in the Same Field: If you fundamentally enjoy the work your work and are engaged by your industry, you may just want a new job. In this scenario, it may just be your particular job—the co-workers, the hours, the culture, etc.—that isn’t a good fit, rather than this type of job or career in general. Often, mid-career professional workers are promoted into management positions that are less personally satisfying than when they worked directly on projects. If that’s the case for you, you may want to move down the career ladder within your field.



New Career in Different Industry, Using Similar Skills: If your industry is contracting or growing obsolete, or you feel ready for a significant change in focus, a job that utilizes your same skills, but with a twist, might be your best option. For instance, a journalist might want to switch to public relations, still using storytelling and communications skills, but in a different arena.



A Total Career Pivot: Sometimes a complete change is necessary. At mid-career, many people want to reinvent their work life (and themselves!) entirely. Think of the corporate worker who yearns to leave the city entirely and work on a farm. That’s a big transition—but it’s doable. For a strong, successful transition, you’ll need to identify what is currently making you unhappy, and what will make you happy in the future. Take a look at these tips for evaluating whether your career needs a makeover. Speak with co-workers and friend, and get their take. These conversations may help clarify how big a move you should make. Think about all the jobs you’ve ever held, stretching back to after-school and summer job as a teen, for more insight into what you do well, and what you enjoy most. If your first job was in retail, for instance, was it helping customers find what they wanted that was most satisfying, or leaving the shelves orderly at the end of the day?
If you’re struggling to figure out what you want or are overwhelmed with the possibilities, take a look at some of these free career quizzes, aptitude tests, and self-assessment tools.



Create a Plan: Once you identify your ideal job, your next step is to come up with a plan for how to get it. You’ll need to engage with real-world considerations (think: monthly bills; your kids’ schools; etc.) to ensure that your dream career is realistic based on your existing responsibilities. And, you’ll need to evaluate which skills you have, and which skills you’ll need to add. In some cases, you'll be able to change careers without going back to school.



Identify Your Current Skills: List out all your skills and abilities. What skills and talents do you possess, and how could they be applied to your new field? Remember, as a seasoned worker; you’re in luck: many of the skills employers seek out the most are transferable. Unlike an entry-level employee, you’re not starting from scratch. If you have worked in television production, for instance, but want to move to human resources, your interpersonal skills, as well as problem-solving abilities, and a knack at juggling tasks and managing personalities, can be tremendously helpful.



Identify the Skills You Need to Have: Next, look at job postings for the position you want to have. What requirements are listed? Remember, you don’t need to have every requirement listed on a job posting to apply—but there are some that are often deal-breakers. You may need to take a class or get a degree. You may need to take a salary cut and start at a lower-level position than the one you’re at currently. Or, you may need to think of creative ways to add experience to your resume, such as taking on a volunteer position that allows you to learn new skills.
Use all of this information to create a timeline and to-do list for your transition to new work—this may involve taking classes,